All posts tagged: yoga for trauma

Community Yoga Teacher Training, Liverpool, 2023-24

The aim of this training is to transmit, over a one year period, principles and practices of traditional yoga in order to become an effective community yoga teacher. Participants will develop their own yoga practice and learn how to safely share this experiential knowledge with friends, family and the communities they serve. Participants will acquire a solid foundation of the ancient yoga tradition and yoga philosophy. Changes will be observed on the physical, mental, emotional and energetic levels. Breathing techniques, meditation, chanting and relaxation practices will be developed throughout the training as vital for creating peace and wellbeing. Topics covered: Classical yoga postures, breathing techniques, cleansing techniques, relaxation practices (shavasana, yoga nidra) and meditation techniques Trauma-informed yoga Yogic lifestyle Yoga teaching practice Who is it for? Refugees and asylum seekers wishing to share yoga and its mental health benefits with friends, family and the broader community Yoga practitioners wishing to work with refugees or other vulnerable communities that would benefit from acquiring yoga skills for wellbeing Anyone passionate about taking yoga to refugees or other

“Sow seeds of love wherever you go”

– Quote by Swami Niranjanananda Saraswati These are some personal reflections by Mantramala (Minna Jarvenpaa) on the Yoga Pura Vida teacher training that Tools for Inner Peace supported in Sierra Leone: The week before our departure from Sierra Leone was full of emotion: grief, joy, memory of old hurts, love. Over the course of the first eleven days of the training, participants had been finding their way into all the aspects of yoga, opening up, releasing tension, going deeper. Old memories were starting to come up, both tender and sad.  On Day 12, we started teaching Yoga for Children and discovered that many of the participants had been orphans, street children or refugees from the civil war; some had survived sexual abuse or abandonment. Others had been pulled out of school and made to work in the streets by relatives. Several had never had the safety or care to really be children. All carried within them the inter-generational trauma of slavery on which Sierra Leone was built. Now we were asking these same people –