All posts tagged: yoga for trauma

Yoga for Trauma workshop, 8-10 July 2022

This is an informal experience sharing workshop for those wishing to teach yoga to refugees or other trauma survivors. Since 2017, we have been growing a community of yoga teachers and psychotherapists who are interested in teaching yoga to refugees or in deepening their understanding of how trauma effects our body and mind, and how to restore wellbeing, individually and collectively through the tools of yoga. The aim of the 8-10 July weekend is to continue developing our understanding and sharing experiences about teaching yoga practices in a manner appropriate to refugees and other trauma survivors. It will be an informal weekend, with practical asana, pranayama, yoga nidra and meditation sessions, as well as facilitated group discussions on topics such as the following: Understanding the neuroscience of trauma recovery Learning about teaching yoga to people with trauma Practising yoga to free up the body, the breath and emotions from tensions Orienting to presence and safety in the here and now As part of the weekend, there will also be karma yoga (including preparing meals together),

“Sow seeds of love wherever you go”

– Quote by Swami Niranjanananda Saraswati These are some personal reflections by Mantramala (Minna Jarvenpaa) on the Yoga Pura Vida teacher training that Tools for Inner Peace supported in Sierra Leone: The week before our departure from Sierra Leone was full of emotion: grief, joy, memory of old hurts, love. Over the course of the first eleven days of the training, participants had been finding their way into all the aspects of yoga, opening up, releasing tension, going deeper. Old memories were starting to come up, both tender and sad.  On Day 12, we started teaching Yoga for Children and discovered that many of the participants had been orphans, street children or refugees from the civil war; some had survived sexual abuse or abandonment. Others had been pulled out of school and made to work in the streets by relatives. Several had never had the safety or care to really be children. All carried within them the inter-generational trauma of slavery on which Sierra Leone was built. Now we were asking these same people –